Mt. San Antonio College: Vote Yes on Measure GO Bonds - Los Angeles County - 2018 general Election
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  Welcome    Question    Analysis    Argument in Favor    Rebuttal in Favor    Argument Against    Rebuttal Against    Full Text    Tax Rate    Resolution  

Welcome to the Yes No on Measure GO Campaign

#HonestBallots Movement

Your Los Angeles County Registrar of Voters printed and circulated ballots for this measure that didn't conform to the law. The registrar ignored our Notice and Demand to follow the law. The legislature makes this a crime. (See: How 25 County Registrars Committed A Crime.)

If you want to get really steamed up about the collusion between your Registrar and Mt. San Antonio College to lie and cheat in order to steal your taxes, you can read the letter for yourself.

Do you want to give this district a Thanksgiving surprise? Please call or text me (with #HonestBalllots, Los Angeles, 85, and your name) at 909-378-5401 right now for details. It's urgent and very time-sensitive.

Are you sure you want vote to support this extravagant measure? It has no accountability.

This campaign was designed by a member of the school bonds cartel. We figured out just the right words to get you to you to open up your checkbook.

We'd also like to introduce you to our partners -- bond lawyers, brokers, wealthy investors, architects, management firms, construction companies, and trade unions. We all stand to make a ton of money on these bonds. Our profits come right off the top, before a penny is actually spent on improving the facilities.

We're not just doing it for the money. We like to show off our work in Architectural Digest and other places where the rich and famous congregate.

Remember, we've taken a lot of risk. We gave money to get your governing board members elected, so they'd be sure to remember us when we came around for a hand-out later.

It's just business-as-usual, here in sunny Corruptifornia.

Please don't read the fine print. That's just put in by the lawyers to make what we're going to do to for you legal.

Community College Facts

What California community college districts don't want you to know!

When I refer to they, I mean the administrators, staff, deans, and all the title-laden academic bureaucrats, who milk the system to become millionaires on the public dime. These are the people with the $100,000+ salaries and $100,000+ pensions. They like hobnobbing with the rich and famous.

The following facts are general in nature. There are always exceptions to the rule. Some motivated students do make great use of the system. How many, no one knows (purposely). That way they can make all kinds of claims that warm the cockles of your heart, that are based on nothing but anecdotes and wishful thinking. Without parents breathing down their necks, they can get away with anything they want.

Community college foundations fund bond elections.
This surprised me. How can donors who get tax deductions pay for political campaigns with their donations? Easy! Launder it through community college foundations. More than 90% of community college bond elections are funded solely by the college's charitable foundation. They only get away with it because you don't report it to the FBI and the IRS.
They're going virtual.
The first virtual community college has already gone online. All those buildings and other facilities are about to become obsolete. Think about all those stadiums and sports complexes the districts want to build. Heck, they could do the web hosting in Estonia and no one would be the wiser.
California Constitution Is Silent
Unlike K-12, the University of California system, and the California State University System community colleges are not given any recognition in the state constitution. The legislature could end them tomorrow. (The legislature won't because they provide high-paying, unaccountable employment for many public employees.)
Adult Babysitting/Marijuana Haven
A hefty percentage of students spend time hanging out, using all the cool Internet services, smoking weed, and partying.
College Promise
They have to give their services away for free. College Promise is the latest fraud. The colleges already give away courses to enrolled high school students*, now they're giving course to graduates. This stuff is a way to counteract the lack of interest.
*It's also double dipping, because both the college and the school district get state money for the dually enrolled high school student.
State Funding
They all compete with each other to get their FTES (full-time equivalent student) (ADA average daily attendance for K-12). Remember back in 2017 when the entire California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office (CCCCO) (another layer of pure bureaucracy) and all the college bureacrats were wetting their diapers when Trump announced that he was ending DACA. One has to wonder if the entire business model, if you can even call it that, is based on a steady stream of government programs.
Fees For Everything
Unlike free public schools, community colleges can charge for anything. The more revenue streams the better. That's what keeps bureaucrats busy, busy, busy. With a student ID, a lot of stuff is free to use. Even though you pay for it all, if you want to use it, you can't. How much money do you think these districts collect in parking fees and fines every year?
Performance Statistics
Good luck if you want to find out whether you're getting your money's worth. With the meager and often irrelevant data that the CCCCO collects and it's equally worthless data query tools, you can spend hours trying to compare one college to another and end up giving up. The collleges don't want you to know the facts. Then they can make up their rosy propaganda without anyone being able to hold them accountable.
Out-of-District Students
Since the legislature removed the tuition penalty for out-of-district students, community colleges have become marketing machines, spending huge amounts on recruitment. They recruit students from all over the country and all over the world. Foreign students and out-of-state students are especially lucrative. Athletes from everywhere in the world fill the rosters for sports programs, all paid for with your taxes.
The big wigs don't like to call themselves superintendents.
They prefer big-boy or big-girl or big-whatever pants. They like titles like Chancellor, President, CEO, and all the corporate C-level titles. Unlike private corporations, however, they feed at the public trough.
Pushing for four-year degrees.
They want always want more money. They've been pushing the legislature for years to get to offer four-year degrees. The pilot programs are being extended.

Remind me again. Why are taxpayers paying for this?

When you see highlighting in the documents below, it to see the commentary.

  Welcome    Question    Analysis    Argument in Favor    Rebuttal in Favor    Argument Against    Rebuttal Against    Full Text    Tax Rate    Resolution  

Measure GO Question

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EXHIBIT A

"MT. SAN ANTONIO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT JOB TRAINING, COLLEGE TRANSFER, CLASSROOM REPAIR, SAFETY MEASURE. To upgrade job training/college transfer/vocational classrooms, science, computer/technology labs, improve student safety, veterans' career resources, access for disabled students; remove asbestos, replace deteriorating roofs, gas, electrical/sewer lines; acquire, construct, repair sites, facilities, equipment; shall Mt. San Antonio Community College District's measure authorizing $750,000,000 in bonds, at legal rates, levying 2.5 cents/$100 assessed valuation, $37,000,000 annually while bonds are outstanding, be adopted, requiring annual audits/citizen oversight?"

Bonds - Yes Bonds – No

  Welcome    Question    Analysis    Argument in Favor    Rebuttal in Favor    Argument Against    Rebuttal Against    Full Text    Tax Rate    Resolution  

Impartial Analysis for Measure GO

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Approval of Measure GO ("Measure") would authorize the Board of Trustees ("Board") of the Mt. San Antonio Community College District ("District"), which placed the Measure on the ballot by Resolution No. 18-01, to issue general obligation bonds in an amount not to exceed $750,000,000.

Proceeds from the sale of bonds authorized by the Measure shall be used only for the purposes specified in the Measure, including, but not limited to, providing job training and vocational programs; removing asbestos and mold; repairing gas, electric, and sewer lines; electrical and sewer lines; improving access to facilities for people with disabilities; making seismic upgrades; replacing and/or upgrading fire, sprinkler, security, lighting, and emergency-communication systems; constructing new, permanent buildings; upgrading science, computer, and technology labs; expanding career and academic counseling facilities; upgrading vocational classrooms; repairing classrooms and other facilities; upgrading technology infrastructure; improving water conservation and energy efficiency; repairing and/or replacing heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems; repairing and/or replacing hard courts, fields, turf, and irrigation systems; and upgrading roadways and pedestrian paths. Bond proceeds may be used to pay or reimburse the District for the cost of District staff when performing work on, or necessary or incidental to, bond projects. Bond proceeds may not be expended on teacher, faculty, or administrator salaries or other operating expenses.

The Board shall cause independent performance and financial audits to be conducted annually to ensure that bond proceeds are spent only for projects identified in the Measure. The Board shall appoint an independent Citizens' Oversight Committee under Education Code sections 15278 et seq. to ensure that bond proceeds are spent as specified in the Measure and as provided by law. The Board shall deposit bond proceeds in a special account and comply with statutory reporting requirements.

Bonds shall be issued under Education Code section 15300 et seq. or Government Code section 53506 et seq. The maximum rate of interest on any bond shall not exceed the legal limit. According to the District's Tax Rate Statement, the best estimate of the average annual tax rate required to fund the bonds, based on assessed valuations available when the District filed the statement, is $25 per $100,000 of assessed valuation. The best estimate of the highest tax rate required to fund the bonds is the same as the average tax rate. The final fiscal year the tax is estimated to be collected is 2057-58. The estimated total debt service required to be repaid if all bonds are issued and sold is $1,455,662,029, including principal and interest. Estimated tax rates are based on the assessed value of taxable property on official tax rolls, not on a property's market value.

This Measure requires a fifty-five percent (55%) vote for passage.

Read less

— Mary C. Wickham, County Counsel

  Welcome    Question    Analysis    Argument in Favor    Rebuttal in Favor    Argument Against    Rebuttal Against    Full Text    Tax Rate    Resolution  

Argument in Favor of Measure GO

Arguments FOR

Mt. San Antonio College—known as "Mt. SAC"—serves over 60,000 local students annually with high-quality, affordable education programs.

Vote yes on GO to support local high school students getting a jumpstart on earning college credit, and help local students transfer to 4-year universities.

Whether preparing students for college transfer, expanding vocational education programs, serving veterans or preparing students for vocational education, Mt. SAC is an essential resource for students seeking an affordable, quality education and specialized skills to compete for good-paying, modern careers. Vote yes on GO to upgrade workforce development programs that train and prepare students for today's in-demand jobs and a competitive global economy.

Several buildings at Mt. SAC are over 70 years old and need basic upgrades. Yes on GO funding will remove asbestos; repair leaky roofs, deteriorating restrooms and plumbing; improve disabled accessibility, update our stormwater system to prevent water pollution; replace outdated electrical and air conditioning; and upgrade security and fire safety systems.

Yes on GO keeps our college campus safe by installing cameras, lighting, and up-to-date security measures including improved security and emergency communications systems.

Our communities have a strong tradition of patriotism and supporting our military and our veterans! Mt. SAC serves over 1,100 military veterans, many of whom have recently returned from war zones.

Yes on GO upgrades and expands facilities for veterans' services and job training so returning service members receive the academic and career counseling and support they need to complete their education and enter the civilian workforce.

Yes on GO includes strict fiscal safeguards including Independent Citizens Oversight Committee and annual financial and performance audits. All money will be spent locally and can't be taken by Sacramento. No money can be spent on administrators' salaries or pensions.

To learn more, visit www.gomtsac.org

DR. MANUEL BACA
President, Mt. SAC Board of Trustees

ERIKA DIAZ
War Veteran and Mt. SAC Student

MEGHAN CHEN
San Dimas Homeowner and Taxpayer

ALTA SKINNER
Mt. SAC Citizens Oversight Committee Chair

MARC RUH
55-Year Resident, Homeowner and Taxpayer

  Welcome    Question    Analysis    Argument in Favor    Rebuttal in Favor    Argument Against    Rebuttal Against    Full Text    Tax Rate    Resolution  

Rebuttal to Argument in Favor of Measure GO

Replies to Arguments FOR

Mt SAC administration misleads voters by hailing vocational programs, workforce development, affordable education, veteran's programs and the like to attract votes to a flawed school bond with lack of accountability to taxpayers. Notice that none of the issues raised in the argument against the Bond were addressed:

Waste of Taxpayers' Money: The 2008 Bond of 353 million had literally the same promise of asbestos removal, leaking roofs…etc.

https://ballotpedia.org/Mount_San_Antonio_Community_College_District_bond_proposition,_Measure_RR_(November_2008).

Why weren't these upgrades & repairs done? What happened to the 353 million?

Lack of transparency: Mt. SAC administration lost the 2020 Olympic trials for failing to disclose they were in litigation with the City of Walnut and Taxpayers group. The litigation was specifically for misuse of 2008 Bond monies. This lack of transparency is a continuing pattern of practice for this Mt. SAC administration.

Lack of Accountability: The so-called Citizens Advisory Committee, again proposed in this bond, did nothing to avoid the abuses of the past Bond, yet is again proposed for a bond more than double the amount and maybe the largest for a single campus. Citizen taxpayer's groups have asked for simple accountability by listing projects by priority with separate budgets so taxpayers/voters can see and understand what they are voting for. Mt SAC has refused. Nothing proposed in this bond will protect against a repeat of the abuses of the past.

This Bond would be giving Mt. SAC over a billion-dollar blank check. Vote No on GO

LAYLA ABOU-TALEB
President, United Walnut Taxpayers

SHARON LU
Chinese American Association of Walnut

MANSFIELD COLLINS
Board Member UWT

SANTA CHAKRABARTI
Treasurer, United Walnut Taxpayers

LAMYAA SASSI
Walnut Resident Special Education Teacher

  Welcome    Question    Analysis    Argument in Favor    Rebuttal in Favor    Argument Against    Rebuttal Against    Full Text    Tax Rate    Resolution  

Argument Against Measure GO

Arguments AGAINST

Mt. SAC is asking $750 Million from taxpayers. The amount of this bond makes it most likely the largest single campus school bond in US history! In the end taxpayers will fork up to $2 Billion with interest. We join with two of the seven Mt. SAC Trustees who oppose this bond.

This Mt. SAC administration has a recent history of litigation where the court found it had abused its power and discretion. Mt SAC is asking for $2 Billion while presently in court facing charges of misuse and inappropriate expenditures from its prior 2008, $350 Million plus interest bond. In addition, mismanagement and legal entanglements with City, State and Federal agencies have resulted in inefficient use of the 2008 bond budget and up to $5 Million in litigation costs. This history also includes losing the 2020 Olympic Trials because of a lack of transparency and accountability with the US Olympics organization. If history repeats itself, Mt. SAC will squander our hard-earned tax dollars and return in a few years for a bail out.

This is not a responsible, accountable and transparent bond. We supported Walnut Valley Unified School District school bond in 2016 because it reflected responsibility in amount, accountability in use and transparency in process. When given the chance Mt. SAC administration failed to adopt these same criteria.

Our criteria are designed as a safeguard against out of control spending, cozy contractor agreements and unauthorized projects. Our most important criteria would be a dramatically reduced bond for essential facilities, and the adoption of a specific prioritized Project List with estimated cost. In the 2008 bond, Mt. SAC promised to upgrade and repair the campus library. Ten years later and broken promises.

Vote NO on this bond.

United Walnut Taxpayers

LAYLA ABOU-TALEB
President UWT

MANSFIELD COLLINS
UWT Board Member

KAMAL S. ISKANDER
UWT Board Member

DENNIS G. MAJORS
UWT Board Member

NAM HUYNH
UWT Board Member

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Rebuttal to Argument Against Measure GO

Replies to Arguments AGAINST

Don't be misled by political lies.

Your choice is to support Mt. SAC students, faculty, and affordable college education by voting yes on GO, or to believe special interests seeking to undermine our educational mission. Support Mt. SAC -- vote yes on GO!

These are the FACTS the opposition wants you to ignore.

Fact: The entire Mt. SAC Board of Trustees supports yes on GO to provide local veterans and students of all ages with an outstanding, affordable college education. Every trustee supports yes on GO!

Fact: Our College is an excellent steward of your taxpayer dollars. Every dime of voter-approved funding has been spent responsibly to fix aging buildings, improve campus safety, expand classrooms, and upgrade teaching and learning environments. View past independent citizens' oversight committee reports at www.mtsac.edu/fiscal/audits.html.

Fact: Maintaining Mt. SAC's academic programs requires 21st century learning environments. Our plan was developed following an extensive campus needs assessment by faculty, staff, and students--and input on priorities from hundreds of local residents.

The facts are:

Our 75-year-old college buildings must be repaired.

Our campus needs to be made safer by installing up-to-date 911 and safety security systems.

Mt. SAC prepares thousands of students annually for college transfer and the vocational training needed for highly competitive, in-demand jobs. We must continue to update our teaching and learning environments to meet the demand for students seeking an affordable college education.

Join faculty, staff, veterans and the entire Board of Trustees by voting yes on GO. www.gomtsac.org

JAY CHEN
Member, Mt. SAC Board of Trustees

LAURA SANTOS
Member, Mt. SAC Board of Trustees

MANUEL BACA
President, Mt. SAC Board of Trustees

BRUCE LAZENBY
Board President, Regional Chamber of Commerce-San Gabriel Valley*

JANE DYER-SMITH
Retired Walnut Elementary School Teacher, 30-year Walnut Resident and Taxpayer

*Title for identification purposes only

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Full Text of Measure GO

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EXHIBIT B

FULL TEXT BALLOT PROPOSITION

MT. SAN ANTONIO COMMUNITY COLLEGE CAREER EDUCATION, REPAIR AND
STUDENT SAFETY MEASURE

ELECTION NOVEMBER 6, 2018

"MT. SAN ANTONIO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT JOB TRAINING, COLLEGE TRANSFER, CLASSROOM REPAIR, SAFETY MEASURE. To upgrade job training/college transfer/vocational classrooms, science, computer/technology labs, improve student safety, veterans' career resources, access for disabled students; remove asbestos, replace deteriorating roofs, gas, electrical/sewer lines; acquire, construct, repair sites, facilities, equipment; shall Mt. San Antonio Community College District's measure authorizing $750,000,000 in bonds, at legal rates, levying 2.5 cents/$100 assessed valuation, $37,000,000 annually while bonds are outstanding, be adopted, requiring annual audits/citizen oversight?"

Bonds - Yes Bonds – No

PROJECTS

The Board of Trustees of the Mt. San Antonio Community College District, to be responsive to the needs of its community, evaluated Mt. San Antonio College's urgent and critical facility needs, and its capacity to provide students, and Veterans with support and job training facilities, an affordable education and prepare them for success in college and careers. Job training facilities, safety issues, class size and offerings, and information and computer technology were each considered in developing the types of projects to be funded by this measure, as such are described below and also outlined in the District's 2018 Educational and Facilities Master Plan (EFMP), dated May 9, 2018 and incorporated herein by reference in its entirety (the "Master Plan"), and available for review on the District's website, www.mtsac.edu. In developing the types of projects, basic repairs (such as removing asbestos and mold, repairing deteriorating, electrical and sewer lines and improving access for disabled students), job training facilities, student safety, facilities supporting Veterans, and the expansion of opportunities for local students to receive an affordable, quality education, were prioritized. If these facility needs are not addressed now, Mt. San Antonio College would be unable to remain competitive in preparing students for jobs in high demand industries and university transfer.

The Board of Trustees determines that Mt. San Antonio College MUST:

  1. (i) Provide an affordable local alternative to four-year universities for local students and returning veterans;
  2. (ii) Provide job training and vocational programs that are needed to keep our local economy strong;
  3. (iii) Respond to the changing economy by upgrading classrooms and labs so students have up-to-date skills and access to modern technology;
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  5. (iv) Ensure that Mt. San Antonio College expands access so more students can enroll in high-quality and affordable education programs to help students transfer to a four year college and allow high school students to get a jumpstart taking college courses.

The following types of projects which are authorized to be undertaken at Mt. San Antonio College, include:

PROVIDE AN AFFORDABLE EDUCATION IN A SAFE ENVIRONMENT FOR LOCAL STUDENTS AND VETERANS:

Basic Upgrade Projects Needed Allow Mt. San Antonio
College to Provide Job Training and Vocational
Programs That Are Needed To Keep the Local Economy Strong

Goals and Purposes: Several buildings at Mt. San Antonio College are over 75-years old and need basic improvements. Funds will be used to remove asbestos, repair leaky roofs and deteriorating restrooms and plumbing, improve handicapped accessibility, update the storm water system to prevent water pollution, replace outdated electrical and air-conditioning systems and upgrade security and fire safety systems.

Mt. San Antonio College is an essential resource for students seeking vocational education that provides the job training, technical knowledge, and specialized skills to compete for good paying, modern careers. This bond measure will upgrade workforce development programs to train and prepare students for today's in-demand jobs and a competitive global economy.

  • ? Improve access to college facilities for people with disabilities.
  • ? Repair deteriorating gas, electrical and sewer lines.
  • ? Repair or replace leaky roofs, 40-year old plumbing, electrical and heating systems, decaying walls and drainage systems.
  • ? Upgrade aging, seismically unsafe buildings and facilities.
  • ? Improve college safety and security systems, including fire security and sprinklers, safety lighting, security door locks, security cameras and emergency communication systems.

PROVIDE EARLY COLLEGE, JOB TRAINING AND COLLEGE TRANSFER:

Classroom and Program Improvements To Help Local Students
and Veterans Transfer to Four-Year Universities;
Be Trained For Good Paying, Modern Careers; or
Allow High School To Jumpstart Earning College Credits

Goal and Purpose: Mt. San Antonio College's high-quality and affordable education programs help students to transfer to four-year universities and allow high school 3
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students to get a jumpstart on earning college credit by taking college courses. This measure will ensure that Mt. SAC can expand access so more students can attend college.

Mt. San Antonio College serves over a thousand military veterans, many of whom have recently returned from war zones. This measure will upgrade and expand facilities for veteran services and job training so returning Service Members receive the academic and career counseling and support they need to complete their education and enter the civilian workforce.

  • ? Expand vocational training facilities/programs for disabled students.
  • ? Upgrade science, computer and technology labs; construct new permanent buildings.
  • ? Expand career and academic counseling facilities/resources for students.
  • ? Upgrade job training and vocational classrooms.
  • ? Repair deteriorating classrooms and facilities.

In addition to the listed types of projects stated above, the types of authorized projects of the measure also include the acquisition of a variety of instructional, maintenance and operational equipment, including interim funding incurred to advance fund projects and the refinancing of outstanding lease obligations, payment of the costs of preparation of all facility planning, fiscal reporting, facility studies, assessment reviews, facility master plan preparation and updates, environmental studies (including environmental investigation, remediation and monitoring), design and construction documentation, and temporary housing of dislocated college activities caused by construction projects. In addition to the projects listed above, repair, renovation and construction projects may include, but not be limited to, some or all of the following: renovate student and staff restrooms; replace aging electrical and plumbing systems; repair and replace heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems; acquire vehicles; upgrade of facilities for energy efficiencies including the installation of solar panels or arrays; repair and replace worn-out and leaky roofs, windows, walls doors and drinking fountains; replace or remove outdated buildings and classrooms and construct new classrooms and support buildings; install wiring and electrical systems to safely accommodate computers, technology and other electrical devices and needs; upgrade facilities to meet current environmental sustainability and State compliance standards; repair and replace fire alarms, emergency communications and security systems; upgrade, resurface, replacing or relocate hard courts, fields, turf and irrigation systems; install artificial turf on athletic fields; upgrade classrooms; build new facilities as described in the Facilities Master Plan, including, science building, student center, indoor/outdoor physical education facilities, library/learning resource center, adult education, auditorium, bookstore, fine arts, Makerspace, continuing education, student services, technical education, transit center, parking structures, tennis courts/parking, gym, wellness center, physical education complex (including stadium); major renovation projects include the construction, expansion, upgrade or reconfiguration of facilities including college service buildings 6 and 23, general instruction classroom buildings (28AB), humanities and social sciences (26ABCD), science classrooms (7 and 60) and student services (9B); smaller projects include improvements to Brackett Field, fire training facilities, Heritage Hall, Maintenance and Operations Building 47, Receiving and 4
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Transportation Building 48, reuse depot, sand volleyball courts, athletic toilet rooms and concessions, and Studio Theater 2T; upgrade, resurface and recondition existing parking lots, roads and sidewalks; repair, upgrade and install interior and exterior lighting systems; replace water lines and valves and sewer lines; construct, upgrade, acquire or expand farm precinct (including Farm Road realignment), natural habitat and urban forest upgrades, multi-use classrooms and labs, swing space, outdoor classrooms/ performance space, field lights, bleachers, press box, track replacement, and collaborative office suites; improve water conservation and energy efficiency; acquire land; replace existing window systems with energy-efficient systems to reduce costs; improve insulation, weatherproofing and roofs to reduce costs; improve access for the disabled; install and repair fire safety equipment, including alarms, smoke detectors, sprinklers, emergency lighting, and fire safety doors; replace broken concrete walks, deteriorated asphalt; replace/upgrade existing signage to reflect wayfinding master plan, bells and clocks; demolition of unsafe facilities; install or upgrade new security systems, such as security (surveillance) cameras, burglar alarms, handrails, outdoor lighting, fencing, landscaping, gates, gateways and classroom door locks; replace sewer lines and improve drainage systems to prevent flooding; upgrade roadway and pedestrian paths and pathways and bridges for improved safety and access for emergency vehicles, site parking, utilities and grounds; and all projects authorized by the District's Measure RR, approved by the voters on November 4, 2008 along with the refinancing of bond anticipation notes issued to fund Measure RR projects. The upgrading of technology infrastructure includes, but is not limited to, upgrading classroom technology, expanding wireless internet access throughout both college campuses, acquire portable interface devices, servers, switches, routers, modules, sound projection systems, information systems, printers, digital white boards, upgrade voice-over-IP, communication systems, audio/visual and telecommunications systems, call manager and network security/firewall, Internet connectivity, wireless systems, technology infrastructure, and other miscellaneous IT and instructional equipment, DATA storage, fiber/copper infrastructure, phones, identity access cards and the creation and funding of a technology endowment.

The listed projects will be completed as needed. Each project is assumed to include its share of furniture, equipment, architectural, engineering, and similar planning costs, program/project management, staff training expenses, a customary contingency, and costs associated with the Total Cost of Ownership of facilities and equipment. The allocation of bond proceeds may be affected by the final costs of each project. Some projects may be undertaken as joint use projects in cooperation with other local public or non-profit agencies. The budget for each project is an estimate and may be affected by factors beyond the District's control. The final cost of each project will be determined as plans and construction documents are finalized, construction bids are received, construction contracts are awarded and projects are completed. Based on the final costs of each project, certain of the projects described above may be delayed or may not be completed. Demolition of existing facilities and reconstruction of facilities scheduled for repair and upgrade may occur, if the Board determines that such an approach would be more cost-effective in creating more enhanced and operationally efficient campuses. Necessary site preparation/restoration may occur in connection with new construction, renovation or remodeling, or installation or removal of relocatable classrooms, including ingress and egress, removing, replacing, or installing irrigation, utility lines, trees and landscaping, relocating fire access roads, and acquiring any necessary easements, licenses, or rights of way to the property. Proceeds of the bonds may be used to pay or reimburse the District for the cost of District staff when performing work on or necessary and incidental to bond projects. Bond proceeds shall only be expended for the types of projects and purposes 5
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identified herein. The District shall create an account into which proceeds of the bonds shall be deposited and comply with the reporting requirements of Government Code § 53410.

FISCAL ACCOUNTABILITY

This bond measure has strict accountability requirements including:

1. All money will benefit Mt. San Antonio College campus and CANNOT BE TAKEN BY THE STATE.

2. NO MONEY can be used for ADMINISTRATOR SALARIES or pensions.

3. Require TAXPAYER OVERSIGHT and yearly audits to ensure all funds are used locally, effectively and as promised.

4. NO ADMINISTRATOR SALARIES. Proceeds from the sale of the bonds authorized by this proposition shall be used only for the acquisition, construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, or replacement of school facilities, including the furnishing and equipping of school facilities, and not for any other purpose, including teacher, faculty and college administrator salaries, pensions and other operating expenses.

5. FISCAL ACCOUNTABILITY. THE EXPENDITURE OF BOND MONEY ON THESE PROJECTS IS SUBJECT TO STRINGENT FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS. BY LAW, PERFORMANCE AND FINANCIAL AUDITS WILL BE PERFORMED ANNUALLY, AND ALL BOND EXPENDITURES WILL BE MONITORED BY AN INDEPENDENT CITIZENS' OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE TO ENSURE THAT FUNDS ARE SPENT AS PROMISED AND SPECIFIED. THE CITIZENS' OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE MUST INCLUDE, AMONG OTHERS, REPRESENTATION OF A BONA FIDE TAXPAYERS ASSOCIATION, A BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND A SENIOR CITIZENS ORGANIZATION. NO DISTRICT EMPLOYEES OR VENDORS ARE ALLOWED TO SERVE ON THE CITIZENS' OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE.

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Measure GO Tax Rate Statement

Tax rate

An election will be held in the Mt. San Antonio Community College District (the "District") on November 6, 2018, to authorize the sale of up to $750,000,000 in bonds of the District to finance facilities as described in the proposition. If the bonds are approved, the District expects to issue the bonds in multiple series over time. Principal and interest on the bonds will be payable from the proceeds of tax levies made upon the taxable property in the District. The following information is provided in compliance with Sections 9400 through 9405 of the California Elections Code.

  1. 1. The best estimate of the average annual tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue over the entire duration of the bond debt service, based on assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is 2.5 cents per $100 of assessed valuation (or $25.00 per $100,000 of assessed value). The final fiscal year in which the tax to be levied to fund this bond issue is anticipated to be collected is fiscal year 2057-58.
  2. 2. The best estimate of the highest tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is 2.5 cents per $100 of assessed valuation (or $25.00 per $100,000 of assessed value) in fiscal year 2019-20.
  3. 3. The best estimate of the total debt service, including the principal and interest, that would be required to be repaid if all of the bonds are issued and sold is approximately $1,455,662,029.

Voters should note that the estimated tax rate is based on the ASSESSED VALUE of taxable property on the County of Los Angeles official tax rolls, not on the property's market value. Property owners should consult their own property tax bills to determine their property's assessed value and any applicable tax exemptions.

Attention of all voters is directed to the fact that the foregoing information is based upon the District's projections and estimates only, which are not binding upon the District. The actual tax rates, debt service and the years in which they will apply may vary from those presently estimated, due to variations from these estimates in the timing of bond sales, the amount of bonds sold and market interest rates at the time of each sale, and actual assessed valuations over the term of repayment of the bonds. The dates of sale and the amount of bonds sold at any given time will be determined by the District based on need for construction funds and other factors. The actual interest rates at which the bonds will be sold will depend on the bond market at the time of each sale. Actual future assessed valuation will depend upon the amount and value of taxable property within the District as determined by the County Assessor in the annual assessment and the equalization process.

MICHAEL D. GREGORYK
Vice President, Administrative Services
Mt. San Antonio Community College District

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Measure GO Resolution

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RESOLUTION NO. 18-01

RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF MT. SAN
ANTONIO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT ORDERING
AN ELECTION, AND ESTABLISHING SPECIFICATIONS OF
THE ELECTION ORDER

WHEREAS, the Board of Trustees (the "Board") of the Mt. San Antonio Community College District (the "District") has determined that certain educational facilities need to be constructed, renovated, acquired and equipped, in a fiscally prudent manner, to enable the District to maintain Mt. San Antonio College as a valuable community resource that provides an affordable education to local students and veterans who desire to learn job skills and transfer to four-year universities; and

WHEREAS, since the costs of attending California's public universities has become so expensive, more local students are relying on community colleges, such as Mt. San Antonio College, and the high quality, affordable college options it provides; and

WHEREAS, in today's competitive job environment, Mt. San Antonio College must continue providing important job training and education for local residents entering the workforce for new professions and increase opportunities for local students to earn college credits, certifications and job skills at a reasonable price; and

WHEREAS, because of our changing economy our classrooms and labs must be upgraded to provide students with up-to-date skills and modern technology that will allow for needed programs to keep our local economy strong; and

WHEREAS, Mt. San Antonio College wants to upgrade school security to keep students safe by installing cameras, lighting, and up-to-date security measures including improved security and emergency communication systems; and

WHEREAS, some buildings on campus are over 75-years old and need basic improvements such as the removal of asbestos and mold, the repair of leaky roofs and deteriorating restrooms and plumbing, and the replacement of outdated electrical, security, and fire safety systems; and

WHEREAS, inasmuch as Mt. San Antonio College serves over a thousand military veterans, many of whom have recently returned from war zones, Mt. San Antonio College needs to upgrade and expand facilities for veteran services and job training so returning military service members receive the academic and career counseling and support they need to complete their education and enter the civilian workforce; and

WHEREAS, the State is not providing the District with enough money for the District to adequately maintain Mt. San Antonio College's educational facilities and academic programs; and

WHEREAS, the Board has received information regarding the feasibility of a local bond measure and the District's bonding capacity; and

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WHEREAS, a local measure will provide funds that cannot be taken away by the State to support local college transfer and job training; and

WHEREAS, a local measure will permit the District to ensure a safe, healthy work and study environment by improving campus safety, repairing leaky roofs, and deteriorating gas, electrical and sewer lines; and

WHEREAS, a local measure will update Mt. San Antonio College education facilities and technology to prepare students for 21st century jobs; and

WHEREAS, a local measure will help Mt. San Antonio College expand vocational training programs for disabled students; and

WHEREAS, a local measure will permit the District to ensure the safety of faculty, staff and students by upgrading or replacing aging, seismically unsafe buildings and facilities; and

WHEREAS, such a local measure will include mandatory taxpayer protections, including an independent citizens' oversight of all funds and mandatory annual financial audits to ensure funds are spent only as authorized; and

WHEREAS, the Board and District has solicited stakeholder and community input on priorities from students, faculty, staff, business and civic leaders, and the community; and

WHEREAS, in the judgment of the Board, it is advisable to provide additional funding for job training and workforce preparation for students of all ages, veterans and local residents and to improve facilities for course opportunities in science, technology, engineering, nursing, and other technical vocational careers, by means of a general obligation bond issued in a financially prudent manner; and

WHEREAS, on November 7, 2000, the voters of California approved the Smaller Classes, Safer Schools and Financial Accountability Act ("Proposition 39") which reduced the voter threshold for ad valorem tax levies used to pay for debt service or bonded indebtedness to 55% of the votes cast on a community college district general obligation bond; and

WHEREAS, concurrent with the passage of Proposition 39, Chapter 1.5, Part 10, Division 1, Title 1 (commencing with Section 15264) of the Education Code (the "Act") became operative and established requirements associated with the implementation of Proposition 39; and

WHEREAS, the Board desires to make certain findings herein to be applicable to this election order and to establish certain performance audits, standards of financial accountability and citizen oversight which are contained in Proposition 39 and the Act; and

WHEREAS, the Board determines that, in accordance with Opinion No. 04-110 of the Attorney General of the State of California, the restrictions in Proposition 39, which prohibit any bond money to be used for administrator salaries and other operating expenses of the District shall be strictly monitored by the District's Citizens' Oversight Committee; and

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WHEREAS, pursuant to Education Code Section 15270, based upon a projection of assessed property valuation, the Board has determined that, if approved by voters, the tax rate levied to meet the debt service requirements of the bonds proposed to be issued will not exceed the Proposition 39 limits per year per $100,000 of assessed valuation of taxable property; and

WHEREAS, Elections Code Section 9400 et seq. of the Elections Code (the "Elections Code") requires that a tax rate statement be contained in all official materials, including any ballot pamphlet prepared, sponsored or distributed by the District, relating to the election; and

WHEREAS, the Board now desires to authorize the filing of a tax rate statement and ballot argument in favor of the proposition to be submitted to the voters at the election; and

WHEREAS, pursuant to the Elections Code, it is appropriate for the Board to request consolidation of the election with any and all other elections to be held on November 6, 2018, and to request the Los Angeles County Registrar of Voters to perform certain election services for the District; and

WHEREAS, in the judgment of the Board, it is advisable to request the Los Angeles County Registrar of Voters to call an election pursuant to Proposition 39 on the question of whether general obligation bonds shall be issued and sold on behalf of the District for purposes set forth below.

NOW THEREFORE, THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF MT. SAN ANTONIO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT DOES HEREBY RESOLVE, DETERMINE AND ORDER AS FOLLOWS:

Section 1. That the Board, pursuant to Education Code Sections 15100 et seq., Sections 15264 et seq. and Government Code Section 53506, hereby requests the Los Angeles County Registrar of Voters to call an election under the provisions of Proposition 39 and the Act and submit to the electors of the District the question of whether bonds of the District in the aggregate principal amount of $750,000,000 (the "Bonds") shall be issued and sold to raise money for the purposes described in Exhibits "A" and "B" hereto. Both exhibits are directed to be printed in the voter sample ballot pamphlet. The District's Superintendent/President, Vice President, Administrative Services, or designee of the Superintendent/President is hereby authorized and directed to make any changes to the text of the measure, or to the abbreviated form of the measure, as may be convenient or necessary to comply with the intent of this Resolution, the requirements of election officials, and requirement of law.

Section 2. That the date of the election shall be November 6, 2018.

Section 3. That the purpose of the election shall be for the voters in the District to vote on a proposition, a copy of which is attached hereto and marked Exhibit "A" and incorporated by reference herein, containing the question of whether the District shall issue the Bonds to pay for improvements to the extent permitted by such proposition. In compliance with Proposition 39 and the Act, the ballot proposition in Exhibit "A" is subject to the following requirements and determinations:

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  1. (a) that the proceeds of the sale of the Bonds shall only be used for the purposes set forth in the ballot measure and not for any other purpose, including faculty and administrator salaries and other college operating expenses;
  2. (b) that the Board, in compliance with Proposition 39, and in establishing the projects set forth in Exhibit "B", evaluated the needs of returning veterans, safety, university transfer, enrollment trends, class size reduction, class availability, information technology and technical job training facilities of the District;
  3. (c) that the Board will cause to be conducted an annual, independent performance audit to ensure that the Bond moneys get expended for the projects identified in Exhibits "A" and "B" hereto;
  4. (d) that the Board will cause an annual, independent financial audit of the proceeds from the sale of Bonds to be conducted until all of the Bond proceeds have been expended and accounted for;
  5. (e) that the Board will cause the appointment of a Citizens' Oversight Committee in compliance with Education Code Section 15278 no later than 60 days after the Board enters the election results in its minutes pursuant to Education Code Section 15274. The Citizens' Oversight Committee shall initially consist of at least seven (7) members and at no time consist of less than seven (7) members, with the possible exception of brief periods to fill any unexpected vacancies. The Citizens' Oversight Committee may not include any employee or official of the District or any vendor, contractor or consultant of the District. The Citizens' Oversight Committee shall include all of the following: One (1) member who is active in a business organization representing the business community located within the District; One (1) member who is active in a senior citizens' organization; One member who is active in a bona fide taxpayer association. In furtherance of its specifically enumerated purposes, the Citizens' Oversight Committee may engage in any of the following activities relating solely and exclusively to the expenditure of the Proposition 39 bond proceeds:
    1. (i) Receive and review copies of the annual, independent financial and performance audits performed by independent consultant(s);
    2. (ii) Inspect District facilities and grounds to ensure that Proposition 39 bond revenues are expended in compliance with applicable law;
    3. (iii) Receive and review copies of all scheduled maintenance proposals or plans developed by the District;
    4. (iv) Review efforts of the District to maximize Proposition 39 bond revenues by implementing cost-saving programs; and
  6. (f) that the tax levy authorized to secure the bonds of this election shall not exceed the Proposition 39 limits per $100,000 of taxable property in the District when assessed valuation is projected by the District to increase in accordance with Article XIIIA of the California Constitution.
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Section 4. That the authority for ordering the election is contained in Education Code Sections 15100 et seq., 15340 et seq. and 15264 et seq. and Government Code Section 53506.

Section 5. That the authority for the specifications of this election order is contained in Education Code Section 5322.

Section 6. That the Los Angeles County Registrar of Voters and the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors are hereby requested to consolidate the election ordered hereby with any and all other elections to be held on November 6, 2018 within the District, and pursuant to Elections Code Section 10403, the District acknowledges that the consolidation election will be held and conducted in the manner described in Election Codes Section 10418.

Section 7. That this Resolution shall stand as the "order of election" to the Los Angeles County Registrar of Voters to call an election within the boundaries of the District on November 6, 2018.

Section 8. That the Secretary of the Board is hereby directed to send a certified copy of this Resolution to the Los Angeles County Registrar of Voters no later than August 10, 2018.

Section 9. That the bonds shall be issued pursuant to Education Code Section 15300 et seq. or issued pursuant to Government Code Section 53506. The maximum rate of interest on any bond shall not exceed the maximum rate allowed by Education Code Sections 15140 to 15143, as modified by Government Code Section 53531. The Board approves the filing of a Tax Rate Statement and primary and rebuttal arguments, as appropriate, and directs their publication in accordance with the requirements of the Elections Code.

Section 10. That the Board requests the governing body of any such other political subdivision, or any officer otherwise authorized by law, to partially or completely consolidate such election and to further provide that the canvass be made by any body or official authorized by law to canvass the returns of the election, and that the Board consents to such consolidation.

Section 11. Pursuant to Education Code Section 5303 and Elections Code Section 10002, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors are requested to permit the Registrar of Voters to render all services specified by Elections Code Section 10418, for which services the District agrees to reimburse Los Angeles County, such services to include the publication of a Formal Notice of School Bond Election and the mailing of the sample ballot and tax rate statement (described in Elections Code Section 9401) pursuant to the terms of Education Code Section 5363 and Elections Code Section 12112.

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ADOPTED, SIGNED AND APPROVED this 24th day of July, 2018.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE MT. SAN ANTONIO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

By
Dr. Manuel Baca
President, Board of Trustees
Mt. San Antonio Community College District

Attest:

William T. Scroggins
College President and CEO and
Secretary to the Board of Trustees
Mt. San Antonio Community College District

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DOCSSF/144934v6/022000-0001

STATE OF CALIFORNIA )
)ss
LOS ANGELES COUNTY )

I, William Scroggins, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of Resolution No. 18-01 which was duly adopted by the Board of Trustees of the Mt. San Antonio Community College District at meeting thereof held on the 24th day of July 2018, and that it was so adopted by the following vote:

AYES:

NOES:

ABSENT:

ABSTENTIONS:

By
William T. Scroggins
College President and CEO and
Secretary to the Board of Trustees
Mt. San Antonio Community College District

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